Title

Gender difference in the prevalence of burnout syndrome among third year students of De La Salle Health Sciences Institute-College of Medicine, A.Y. 2015-2016

Date of Completion

2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Community Medicine

Keywords

Burnout, Psychological, Medical Students

Abstract

Analytic, cross-sectional study was employed by the researchers. The total population of the third year medical students was 278 and of which 162 were female and 116 were male. The respondents were identified using stratified random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire of MBI-SS was utilized in collecting the data. The data was then analyzed using t-test and chi-square. Study showed that majority were positive for burnout syndrome, but although a high percentage of respondents were found to be burnout, the results of this research suggests that there was no significant gender difference in the prevalence of burnout syndrome among the third year medical students of De La Salle Health Sciences Institute. This indicated the level of coping or stress management was the same between the two genders, or that the third year of medical school was stressful enough to cause burnout syndrome among students regardless of their gender. This could mean that coping mechanisms from either gender was not the problem nor were the cofounders stated but could be assumed to be due to academic load alone. The study showed that majority of the participants scored high in the professional efficacy despite also having high scores in exhaustion and cynicism. This may indicate that there was a good coping mechanism among the participants despite the heavy workload in the third year of medical school. However, this may be alarming since they were being cynical about their studies and could also be the same in the future towards their patients.

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