Title

Knowledge on the risks and level of self-disclosure on social media among radiologic technology students of De La Salle Health Sciences Institute.

Date of Completion

2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Technology

Keywords

Self-Disclosure, Social Media

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the correlation between knowledge on the risks and the level of self-disclosure on social media among Radiologic Technology students at De La Salle Health Sciences Institute during the second semester of school year 2015-2016. Furthermore, the influence of some demographic variables on the knowledge on the risks and level of self-disclosure was also explored namely: year level, gender and time spent on social media daily. The study used a descriptive correlational research method with a population of 622 radiologic technology students of De La Salle Health Sciences Institute. A three-part questionnaire was used: the first part of which is for the demographic variables; the second part is a self-made questionnaire to measure the knowledge on the risks of self-disclosure and the third part is an adapted-modified questionnaire used to measure the level of self-disclosure on social media. The data gathered was subjected to statistical treatments such as frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, Analysis of Variance, t-test for Independent means, Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient and Duncan's Multiple Range Test. Based on the results, 1) most of the respondents are third year females, who spend about 3-4 hours per day on social media; 2) the respondents have a very high knowledge on the risks of self-disclosure on social media; 3) the respondents have a low level of self-disclosure on social media; 4) there are no significant differences in the knowledge of the respondents on the risks of self-disclosure on social media regardless of how much time they spend on social media but significant differences occur when grouped according to year level and gender. Second year and third year students are more knowledgeable compared to first year and fourth year students who are least knowledgeable on the risks of self-disclosure on social media. Females have also been found to be more knowledgeable compared to their male counter parts; 5) there are no significant differences in the level of self-disclosure on social media of the respondents regardless of gender. However significant differences occur when grouped according to year level and time spent on social media. Fourth year students disclose more in contrast with the second year respondents who disclose the least. It was also found that self-disclosure increases as the time spent on social media increases; 6) there is a very weak negative correlation between knowledge on the risks and level of self-disclosure on social media. This may mean that other than knowledge, there are other factors that may contribute to the respondents' level of self-disclosure such as cultural norms, personality type, type of social media used, privacy settings available, access to the internet, and what an individual wants to gain from the use of social media.

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