Title

Beliefs and practices of pregnant women about prenatal care

Date of Completion

2010

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Technology

Keywords

Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Abstract

The study used descriptive correlational design. One hundred twenty (120) pregnant women from rural and urban places in Cavite, particularly Dasmarinas and Silang, were chosen as respondents using proportional quota sampling. The research instrument was a self-made questionnaire. Data was analyzed through ANOVA, frequency distribution, mean, Pearson’s r or Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient, percentage, standard deviation and t-test of independent means. The following conclusions were drawn: 1) Majority of the respondents were 21-30 years old, attained high school level, unemployed and had a monthly family income of below P10,000. The respondents’ sample size was obtained equally from rural and urban places; 2) The beliefs of pregnant women in terms of nutrition and medical care were measured as to a great extent, which meant that they were supposing that certain beliefs are true. Respondents held superstitious beliefs to a moderate extent, which meant that they do not totally agree on superstitious beliefs. In general, the respondents’ beliefs were to a great extent; 3) In terms of nutrition and medical care, the respondents were practicing the beliefs to a very great extent. Regarding superstitious practices, the respondents practiced to a great extent. This showed that the respondents do not trust superstitious practices completely. In general, the respondents practiced their beliefs to a very great extent; 4) There was no significant difference in the beliefs of pregnant women about pre-natal care when they were grouped according to age, educational attainment, employment status and monthly family income. However, there was a significant difference when the respondents were grouped according to the type of community. Respondents from rural places believed on superstitious beliefs more than those from urban places; 5) There was no significant difference in the beliefs of pregnant women about pre-natal care when they were grouped according to age, educational attainment, employment status, monthly family income and type of community; 6) There was a high positive correlation between the beliefs and practices of pregnant women about pre-natal care. It showed that when the respondents agree in certain beliefs to be true, they practice them as well.

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