Date of Completion

3-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Keywords

human immunodeficiency virus, pregnant women

Abstract

This study utilized a quantitative-descriptive research design to determine the factors that affect the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among pregnant women. A self-made research instrument that comprised of two parts was used to gather data. Using purposive sampling, the respondents involved 80 pregnant women seeking consultation in an out-patient basis at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of a tertiary hospital in Cavite. Data was analyzed through frequency distribution, percentage, mean and ANOVA. The study concluded that, 1) Majority of the respondents were 18 to 39 years old, has a monthly income of less than Php40,000, high school graduates and belongs to Tagalog ethnic group; 2) The respondents agreed to a moderate extent that perceived susceptibility like marital issues, effect on their self-worth, and possible harmful effect on their pregnancy; that perceived barriers like their cultural beliefs, lack of knowledge of preventive measures against HIV, lack to time, and interest; and that perceived severity like the quality of health services for HIV testing, the economic consequences, time consumption for the prenatal check-ups, and the influence of their partner or spouse affect the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among pregnant women. The respondents also agreed to a moderate extent that finding out the result of HIV test early, prevention of the disease, additions on their knowledge about HIV during their pregnancy, experiencing thorough screening test, and reassuring a safe pregnancy affect their acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among pregnant women. However, respondents agreed to a low extent that social stigma attached to HIV/AIDS, discrimination by the society, fear of knowing the result and inadequate pre-test counselling affect the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among pregnant women; 3) There was no significant difference in the factors affecting the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing of pregnant women when they were grouped according to age, educational attainment, and ethnic group. However, there was a significant difference in the factors affecting the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing of pregnant women when they were grouped according to monthly family income.

First Advisor

Julieta M. Damian

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